"Animals are such agreeable friends - they ask no questions, they pass no judgements." George Eliot

Emergency

Emergencies can occur in many forms, and they may require a brief absence from home to permanent evacuation.

    Rescue Alert Sticker

    This sticker should be placed in sight of rescue workers. This information helps the rescue workers to know the types and number of pets in your household.

    Download your own Sticker today.
    Use any white or clear mailing label!

    Arrange A Safe Haven

    DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND. IF IT ISN'T SAFE FOR YOU, IT IS NOT SAFE FOR YOUR PETS.

    Contact Levy County Emergency Management, (352) 486-5213, for pet friendly shelters.

    Emergency Supplies

    Prepare ahead of time an EVAC PACK which should include the following for your pet:
  • Pet first-aid kit and guide book (ask your vet what to include)
  • 3-7 days' worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (be sure to rotate every two months)
  • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
  • Litter or paper toweling
  • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
  • Pet feeding dishes
  • Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
  • Photocopies of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires (Remember, food and medications need to be rotated out of your emergency kit-otherwise they may go bad or become useless.)
  • Bottled water, at least 7 days' worth for each person and pet (store in a cool, dry place and replace every two months)
  • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet
  • Flashlight
  • Blanket (for scooping up a fearful pet)
  • Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make "Lost" posters)
  • 3-7 days' worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (be sure to rotate every two months)
  • Especially for cats: Pillowcase or EvackSack, toys, scoopable litter
  • Especially for dogs: Extra leash, toys and chew toys, a week's worth of cage liner.
  • Emergency Kit for humans as well

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Compliments of the Humane Society of United States
  • Disaster Preparedness for PETS
  • Disaster Preparedness for HORSES
  • Disaster Preparedness for LIVESTOCK
  • Cats

    Caring for YOUR Cat: Top Ten Essentials!

    Although your cat may act independent and be litter trained, he still counts on you to provide him with food, water, safe shelter, and regular veterinary care, companionship and more. Take care of these essentials, and you'll be guaranteed to develop a rewarding relationship with your feline companion.

    Outfit your cat with a collar and ID tag that includes your name, address and telephone number.

    No matter how careful you are, there's a chance your companion may slip out the door-- an ID tag greatly increases the chance that your cat will be returned safely.

    Follow local cat registration laws.

    Licensing, a registration and identification system administered by some local governments, protects both cats and people in the community.

    Keep your cat indoors.

    Keeping your cat safely confined at all times is best for you, your pet, and your community.

    Take your cat to the veterinarian for regular check-ups.

    If you do not have a veterinarian, ask your local animal shelter or a pet-owning friend for a referral.

    Spay or neuter your cat.

    This will keep her healthier and will reduce the problem of cat overpopulation.

    Give your cat a nutritionally balanced diet, including constant access to water.

    Ask your veterinarian for advice on what and how often to feed your pet.

    Train your cat to refrain from undesirable behaviors such as scratching furniture and jumping on countertops.

    Contrary to popular belief, cats can be trained with a bit of patience, effort, and understanding on your part.

    Groom your cat often to keep her coat healthy, shiny, and soft.

    Although it is especially important to brush long-haired cats to prevent their hair from matting, even short haired felines need to be groomed to remove as much loose hair as possible. When cats groom themselves, they ingest a great deal of hair, which often leads to hair balls.

    Set aside time to play with your cat.

    While cats do not need the same level of exercise that dogs do, enjoying regular play sessions with your pet will provide him with the physical exercise and mental stimulation he needs, as well as strengthen the bond you share.

    Be loyal to and patient with your cat.

    Make sure the expectations you have of your companion are reasonable and remember that the vast majority of behavior problems can be solved. If you are struggling with your pet's behavior, contact your veterinarian or local animal shelter for advice.

    Download Brochures

    Compliments of the Humane Society of the United States


  • Solving Cat Aggression towards People
  • Solving Cat Aggression towards Family Cats
  • Dogs

    Caring for YOUR Dog: Top Ten Essentials!

    Your dog gives you a lifetime of unconditional love, loyalty, and friendship. In return, she counts on you to provide her with food, water, safe shelter, regular veterinary care, exercise, companionship, and more. Take care of these ten essentials, and you'll be guaranteed to develop a rewarding relationship with your canine companion.

    Outfit your dog with a collar and ID tag.

    Include your name, address, and telephone number. No matter how careful you are, there's a chance your companion may become lost - an ID tag greatly increases the chance that your pet will be returned home safely.

    Follow local laws for licensing your dog and vaccinating him for rabies.

    Check with your local shelter or humane society for information regarding legal requirements, where to obtain tags, and where to have your pet vaccinated.

    Follow this simple rule - OFF PROPERTY, ON LEASH.

    Even a dog with a valid license, rabies tag, and ID tag should not be allowed to roam outside of your home or fenced yard. It is best for you, your community, and your dog to keep your pet under control at all times.

    Give your DOG proper shelter.

    A fenced yard with a doghouse is a bonus, especially for large and active dogs; however, dogs should never be left outside alone or for extended periods of time. Dogs need and crave companionship and should spend most of their time inside with their family.

    Take your dog to the Veterinarian for regular check-ups.

    If you do not have a veterinarian, ask your local animal shelter or a pet-owning friend for a referral.

    Spay or Neuter your dog.

    Dogs who have this routine surgery tend to live longer, be healthier, and have fewer behavior problems (e.g., biting, running away). By spaying or neutering your dog, you are also doing your part to reduce the problem of pet overpopulation.

    Give your pooch a nutritionally balanced diet, including constant access to fresh water.

    Ask your veterinarian for advice on what and how often to feed your pet.

    Enroll your dog in training classes.

    Positive training will allow you to control your companion's behavior safely and humanely, and the experience offers a terrific opportunity to enhance the bond you share with your dog.

    Give your dog enough excerise to keep him physically fit (but not exhausted).

    Most dog owners find that playing with their canine companion, along with walking him twice a day, provides sufficient exercise. If you have questions about the level of exercise appropriate for your dog, consult your veterinarian.

    Be loyal to and patient with your faithful companion.

    Make sure the expectations you have of your dog are reasonable and remember that the vast majority of behavior problems can be solved. If you are struggling with your pet's behavior, contact your veterinarian or local animal shelter .

    Download Brochures

    Compliments of the Humane Society of the United States

  • Training Technique for Dogs
  • Crate Training
  • Dog Agression
  • Barking Issues
  • Dog Bite Prevention Video
  • Humane Society of Levy County, Inc. © 2015 |